Crane Art 1

Crane Art 1 has a selection of external sites with crane culture, art and music. Please contact us to suggest more crane-related sites or report broken links. Art 2» presents a gallery of crane art in doors, furniture and even streetlights in Yunnan, China while Art 3» presents cranes in Australian logos and signs.


Images on Ozcranes

If you have a commercial project, or grant funding, please support the people who've allowed us to use their photographs and artwork, details in Ozcranes About/Contact page. Explore image databases with cranes at the The Oriental Bird Club, RSPB, and International Crane Foundation.

top TOP

Art

What is it with cranes and pine trees?

Card with cranes

Cranes have featured in art for thousands of years in many cultures, symbolising long life and fidelity. In Chinese, Japanese and Korean art cranes are often depicted with other symbols of long life, especially pine trees.

← Card sent to the Editor's father from Korea, to celebrate his 80th birthday (cranesnorth)

This can be taken too literally, researchers say goodwill towards cranes could be better harnessed for habitat conservation if more people understood that cranes need wetlands not pine trees! This is movingly discussed by N and C Moores on the Birds Korea website, ‘The Crane in a Pine Tree: The state of wetlands in Korea’

Not seeing, who remains to embrace their ancestors' vision of a Crane in a Pine Tree?

Will modern Koreans, who rarely see cranes and confuse them with commmon urban birds like egrets, remember in time?

Art and cranes in India

Sarus in Ramayana

This painting in the Vijayanagar miniature style by Mr. Kambar, was commissioned especially for the Indian Cranes and Wetlands Working Group (ICWWG) by Sahastrarashmi.

← Watercolour on canvas depicting Sarus Cranes in the Sanskrit Hindu epic poem, the Ramayana

It portrays a key event from the first book of the Ramayana, when a hunter is cursed by the sage Valmiki for killing the male of a devoted Sarus Crane pair. Sarus Cranes are venerated in India, for more see Sundar, KS Gopi and BC Choudhury, ‘The Indian Sarus Crane Grus a. antigone: a literature review.’ J. Ecol. Soc 16 (2003): 16-41. This paper, with others, can be read or downloaded free at Archive.org.

Sarus Cranes in village wall mural (K.S. Gopi Sundar); Sarus Crane painting, c. 1800; Entrance to Keoladeo National Park, India: ‘In your next incarnation, you might be an endangered species’ (A & A Freeman)

Sarus in Ramayana Sarus painting 1800 Keoladeo National Park

In Keoladeo National Park, an appeal to cultural values seems not to have saved the Siberian Crane. But people in India are joining and promoting all-India Crane Counts and conservation efforts for other crane species, like this village with a Sarus Crane wall mural. Villagers protect five local Sarus Crane pairs and their chicks, from dogs and hunters.

Crane art in Australia

Brolga dance by Sheree Quinn Dance School, Atherton Tableland, north Queensland (Sheree Quinn); Card to raise funds for Townsville Town Common (Jo Wieneke); Brolga sculpture by Hans Pehl in Yungaburra, far north Queensland (cranesnorth)

Brolga dance Brolgas Brolga sculpture

Crane art links

top TOP

Festivals

Australia's Malanda Crane week (image by cranesnorth). Links to the annual Black-necked Crane Festival in Bhutan, and some of many Sandhill and/or Whooping Crane Festivals in the US, with art, crane-watching and activities

Crane Week

Crane music links

Bone Flute

→ Neolithic Chinese flute made from ulna of Red-crowned Crane Grus japonensis: Henan Provincial Museum (used under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic Licence)

top TOP

Next: Crane Art 2 | Gallery of Crane art from Yunnan: Doors, furniture, and more»

«Back to Resources 1


Change AT to @ and DOT to . in email addresses